MIT: vehicle emissions cause 53,000 extra deaths a year

Filed under: Etc., EV/Plug-in, MPG, USA

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53,000 early deaths are attributed to exhaust from cars and trucks, annually.

And now for some not-so-uplifting news for your Labor Day weekend, especially if it involves a long road trip. Emissions from electric-power generation, industrial operations, commercial and residential sources and transportation (road, marine and rail) sources cause about 200,000 premature deaths in the US each year, Green Car Congress says, citing a study from MIT’s Laboratory for Aviation and the Environment. The key point for us in the automotive world: road transportation alone accounts for “53,000 early deaths per year attributed to exhaust from the tailpipes of cars and trucks.” EV advocates shouldn’t gloat too much, as early deaths from electricity generation came in at 52,000, mostly in the Midwest where coal is still the main source of juice. The data MIT used came from the Environmental Protection Agency’s National Emissions Inventory from 2005, the most recent available.

MIT somehow calculates that pollution-related deaths essentially occur about a decade before that person would’ve otherwise passed away. As far as geography is concerned, California alone accounts for about 21,000 of those 200,000 premature deaths, and fans of The Wire might be interested to know that Baltimore is the US city with the highest number of emissions-related deaths per capita. Amid all this negativity, there is some good news. Pollution-related deaths from rail operations were “relatively slight.” So we have that going for us.

MIT: vehicle emissions cause 53,000 extra deaths a year originally appeared on Autoblog Green on Sat, 31 Aug 2013 14:54:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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MIT studies how age affects distracted driving

Filed under: Etc., Safety, Videos

MIT researchers in the AgeLab car

MIT AgeLab researches distracted driving – click above to watch video after the jump

Auto Observer recently sat down with researchers at the MIT AgeLab to learn more about a new study about distracted driving and how it changes as we age. By placing drivers of various ages into a simulator, researchers can collect data related to distraction. After studying conditions such as heart rate and eye movement, it becomes clear that different age groups are distracted by different stimuli. For example, young people have a harder time tuning out in-car distractions like text messages and cell phones, while older drivers are more impacted by sirens and flashing lights outside of the vehicle.

Researcher Bryan Reimer said that in most cases, reducing distracted driving isn’t so much a matter of leveraging technology to make current car features easier to use; instead, it’s more about properly educating drivers about said features before they hit the road .

AgeLab also investigated a number of other driving-related technologies, including automated parallel parking systems like the one found on the 2010 Lincoln MKS to discern how drivers of various ages would adapt to theem. Hit the jump to see a video on the research.

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MIT studies how age affects distracted driving originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 08 May 2011 17:33:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Navigation concept from MIT and Volkswagen projects 3D image on windshield

Filed under: Technology, Videos, Volkswagen

AIDA 2.0

AIDA 2.0 provides a glimpse at our distracted future – Click above to watch video after the jump

If the idea of someone playing with their phone while driving sounds distracting, then wait until you see the latest navigation concept from MIT and Volkswagen. Called the AIDA Project, this technology joint venture between MIT’s SENSEable City Lab and VW stands for Affective, Intelligent Driving Agent.

Using a series of 3D projectors, a large map would take up residence in the unused space on top of the dashboard. Route guidance, destination information, infotainment options and a host of other features would all be controlled via hand gestures that are sensed by the AIDA 2.0 system.

This makes for very cool-looking tech, but we have to think Ray LaHood would plotz if this ever becomes reality. Also, we think the city of Boston may be virtual in the video demonstration due to the lack of middle fingers being tossed around as if they were Dunkin Donuts Munchkins. Check out AIDA 2.0 by clicking past the jump.

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Navigation concept from MIT and Volkswagen projects 3D image on windshield originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 06 May 2011 16:59:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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