Texans irked about lawmakers spending $25M to woo F1 while teachers are dismissed

Filed under: Motorsports

circuit of the americas

Texas motorsports enthusiasts are no doubt excited about the Circuit of the Americas. Formula One racing, along with MotoGP, will have a new home in Austin, and the United States Grand Prix is sure to attract fans and fan money. Some, however, are not thrilled at the spending decisions being made by Texan lawmakers, as they apparently feel though the money being spent to bring racing to the state could otherwise be used to help teachers keep their jobs.

How much has Texas pledged to bring F1 racing to Austin? According to Bloomberg, Texas Comptroller Susan Combs has signed off to shell out $25 million per year through 2022. That’s a massive chunk of change, and some are not too thrilled at this idea as at the same time, 100,000 teachers could be losing their jobs.

That $25 million per year figure would not be enough to save 100,000 jobs. However, it could save the jobs of 500 teachers earning $48,000 per year. While CotA is bound to bring serious tourist and racing-fan money to the Austin area, should Texas be spending $25 million when teachers across the state are likely to find themselves out of work soon? Have your say in Comments.

Texans irked about lawmakers spending $25M to woo F1 while teachers are dismissed originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 12 May 2011 13:01:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Report: Dana coughs up $25M to Toyota over rusty Tacoma frames

Filed under: Truck, Government/Legal, Recalls, Toyota

1998 Toyota Tacoma

1998 Toyota Tacoma

When an automaker is forced to issue a recall, the defective part or feature is generally the fault of the automaker or of an OEM supplier it contracted to. In the case of the Toyota Tacoma – part of a 110,000-unit recall in 2009 – the problem appears to have been traced back to the supplier. And now the supplier is forced to pay for its mistakes.

The company in question, according to reports, is Dana, the Ohio-based OEM contractor supplying (among other components) axles and driveshafts for automobiles, commercial trucks and heavy equipment. In this case, it supplied the frames for the Tacoma pickup which were found to rust when exposed to road salt.

Although in 2010 Dana sold the plant that manufactures the frame to Mexican conglomerate Grupo Porza’s Metalsa subsidiary, since the component in question was built prior to the sale (from 1995 to 2000), Dana has reportedly been forced to shell out $25 million to Toyota over the issue.

[Source: Reuters]

Report: Dana coughs up $25M to Toyota over rusty Tacoma frames originally appeared on Autoblog on Tue, 18 Jan 2011 17:34:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Sounds About Right: San Francisco spending $25M to determine how much parking should cost

Filed under: Government/Legal

If you reside or frequent a large metropolitan area, you’re probably all too aware of the cost to park your vehicle. In cities like New York or Chicago, you can pay upwards of $30 or more for a full day of parking. To make matters worse, even with astronomical costs many drivers can’t even find an open spot.

San Francisco is looking for a permanent solution to its parking problems by going high tech and paying big bucks to do it. Frisco is investing $25 million on a new electronic parking system that will constantly gauge demand for spots and raise or lower pricing accordingly. So why go to all this expense and trouble to set parking prices?

Parking that’s too cheap may lead to spots getting filled too quickly, which will lead to cars circling around waiting for spots, clogging streets with unnecessary congestion. The goal of the $25 million project is to make parking cheap enough for people to afford it while at the same time expensive enough to ensure spots are always available.

The electronic parking system will work as a network, setting prices between a quarter and $6 per hour depending on demand. The high-tech solution will start with 190 new meters in the Hayes Valley area of San Francisco and in two years end with 6,000 metered spaces and 12,250 spots at the city’s 15 parking garages. The system will eventually make it possible for advanced planners to go online to find where the most spots are located. Distracted driving aficionados will be able to search for spots on their smartphone, making it easier for multi-taskers to park and harder for pedestrians and other drivers to avoid getting hit.

[Source: NPR | Image: Ingrid Taylar – C.C. License 2.0]

Sounds About Right: San Francisco spending $25M to determine how much parking should cost originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 29 Jul 2010 18:32:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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